Health

Cold, cough and influenza season has arrived in Interior Health

If your symptoms are getting worse or you are not recovering, call HealthLink BC at 8-1-1 for medical advice.

It’s that time of year where sniffles, sneezes, and other ailments seem to be lurking around every corner.

In most healthy people, influenza symptoms such as headache, fever, coughing and sneezing and sore throat can last five to seven days. These symptoms are best treated at home by resting, drinking lots of fluids, and taking medicine to lower a fever.
 
Anyone suffering from influenza symptoms should minimize contact with others by staying home from work, school and holiday gatherings to reduce the risk of spreading infection to others.

Give the Gift that Keeps On Giving — register as an organ donor

British Columbians can register online using a computer or mobile device: www.transplant.bc.ca

The B.C. government is urging all British Columbians to get in the holiday spirit and consider giving the greatest gift of all – the gift of life – by registering as an organ donor.

Since Service BC and BC Transplant launched their unique awareness partnership in April 2015, 30,485 new donors have registered through Service BC.

Between April and September of this year, almost 12,000 new registrations were received through Service BC, more than tripling the number over the same period in 2015.

Funding freeze on for new facilities as IHA moves primary care into households: Cusden

The IHA is implementing a five-point strategy for the coming year.

The best way to improve health care delivery in Nelson is not by enhancing its health care facilities, but by keeping potential patients in their homes, says the interim health service administrator for the Interior Health Authority.

Jane Cusden told city council on Monday that the IHA directive for the mostly rural service region — which includes Nelson — is under its primary community care model, one which is preventative in nature, treating people in their homes before they need a hospital.

Sprouted garlic, and how to deal with garlic breath

Sprouted garlic -- don't toss it out

'Tis the season to be jolly, fal-la-la-la-lah and so on -- but it's hard to feel jolly while afflicted with a stuffed or runny nose, headache, coughs and sneezes.  Colds are  not usually  a reason to lurch off  to your doctor; the doctor will just tell you to rest, take lots of hot fluids, and avoid spreading your germs around.  Well, viruses.

Many of us swear by hot home-made chicken broth with onions and garlic to help us vanquish a cold. But what if the garlic is starting to sprout, with little green shoots poking out?

Local Alzheimer's programming to be available in the New Year

Local Alzheimer's programming to be available in the New Year

The New Year is fast approaching, and the Alzheimer Society of BC wants Kootenay/Boundary residents to be aware of services that will be available in 2017.

“We will be offering several workshops for families living with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in the New Year,” said local support and education coordinator Julie Leffelaar.

Highlights of programming include:

Understanding Dementia - Grand Forks:

Tuesday, Jan. 17, from 10 a.m. - noon, Boundary District Hospital, 7649 22nd St., Grand Forks

COLUMN: Four Treats for the Holidays

Dr. Brenda Gill.  Photo by Larry Doell

One of the biggest challenges I find during the Christmas holidays for those who don’t tolerate gluten is desserts and treats. At this time of year they are everywhere and it is ever so tempting to give in and have a few. The easiest solution I’ve found is to make some holiday treats ahead of time, freeze them and pull them out when you have a hankering for some delicious treat or need to go to a dinner or dessert function. Bring these and you’ll have what you need to feel  thoroughly satiated! Enjoy!

Illicit drug death numbers hit new record

From left, Dr. Perry Kendall, Provincial Health Officer; Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe; Clayton Pecknold, Director of Police Services release the latest information regarding illicit drug deaths in B.C. during a media conference Monday. — Photo courtesy BC Government

The month of November brought the highest number of illicit drug deaths in B.C. for a single month in recent memory, according to the latest statistics from the BC Coroners Service.

Provisional data shows that a total of 128 persons died as a result of illicit drug use during November, an average of more than four a day. The previous high for a single month was 82 in January, 2016.

The November numbers bring the total illicit drug deaths for the year to 755, an increase of 70.4% over the number of deaths occurring the same time period last year.

Wilderness preparedness and safety tips

Anyone who makes the decision to go into the backcountry must be able to take care of themselves and their companions.

British Columbia is full of opportunities and unforgettable recreational experiences. But to safely enjoy this province, everyone venturing out into the wilderness has the responsibility of adequately preparing for the trip.

As the number of people in the wilderness has increased in recent years, so have the number of search and rescue operations undertaken by volunteers. Emergency Management BC (EMBC) is encouraging all outdoor enthusiasts to make good decisions in order to stay safe.

COLUMN: Tread Lightly

Too much stuff?

How much stuff will you give and receive this holiday season? Add it to the growing pile — the 30-trillion-tonne pile. That’s how much technology and goods humans have produced, according to a study by an international team led by England’s University of Leicester. It adds up to more than all living matter on the planet, estimated at around four trillion tonnes.

BC statement regarding new Canadian drugs and substances strategy

Officials are seeing illegally produced fentanyl and its analogues imported in varying amounts and mixed with other drugs.

Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General Mike Morris and Minister of Health Terry Lake, along with the co-chairs of the Joint Task Force on Overdose Response, Dr. Perry Kendall and Clayton Pecknold, issued the following joint statement today in response to the federal announcement regarding a new Canadian drugs and substances strategy:

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