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By Alex Atamanenko on Wednesday Aug 11 2010

After years of deteriorating farm income, mounting debt and ill-designed income stability programs, can life on Canadian farms get worse?  It certainly appears so. The government is forecasting that the price of many farm commodities will decline in 2010.  And despite a complete overhaul by the Conservative government, farm income programs are causing the same level of frustration for farmers as the failed programs they were supposed to replace. Between the global economic downturn, climate impacts and bad government policies, farmers are hitting the wall.

By Harvey Oberfeld on Monday Aug 09 2010

If anyone had any doubt it is game over for Premier Gordon Campbell, the latest Angus Reid poll spells it out in black and white.  But what’s worse are the figures that also show that, even with a new leader, the Liberals are heading for an election disaster.

That will be Campbell’s political legacy, barring a miraculous turnaround.

The poll, commissioned by The Vancouver Sun, predicts the Liberals, under Campbell, would garner only 27% public support, compared to 48% for the NDP, 13% for the Greens, and 6% for the Conservatives.

By Contributor on Saturday Aug 07 2010

The B.C salmon farm industry's decision to not co-operate with provincial reporting strategies has rendered government officials impotent and incapable of regulating the notoriously secretive industry, environmental groups Ecojustice and T. Buck Suzuki Environmental Foundation said today.

As of April 1, 2010, salmon farms have refused to volunteer or make available tissue samples for government fish health and sea lice monitoring audits, proving the complete failure of the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands' voluntary compliance strategy.

By Kyra Hoggan on Wednesday Aug 04 2010

 My son did a really neat thing this week – a neat thing that served to underline some ugly truths of our modern world.

By Harvey Oberfeld on Wednesday Aug 04 2010

 Vancouver Police got it wrong in the beginning-- and they’re getting it wrong again at the end. The department has jumped on the politically correct bandwagon and supported calls for a public inquiry into what went wrong in the case of the 26 missing women, who are believed to have died at the hands of  Robert Pickton, already convicted of murder in six of the deaths. 

By Contributor on Saturday Jul 31 2010

"BC Greens oppose the Enbridge  pipelines between the Alberta Tar Sands and Kitimat. The Michigan  spill proves that Enbridge has misled the public on the general safety  of pipelines and on its own record of spills," said Green Party of BC  Leader Jane Sterk.

By Maureen Bader on Wednesday Jul 28 2010
Governments love 'sin' taxes. They fill up the coffers while creating the illusion that government is the high-minded protector of society's moral well-being. But should government be running 'sin' businesses? If the performance of the BC Lottery Corporation (BCLC) is any indication, the answer is no – it creates far too much risk for players and taxpayers.
 
The B.C. government made the province the first jurisdiction in North America to legalize online gambling. Government says people in B.C.
By Rob Leggett on Wednesday Jul 28 2010

 This past weekend my wife and I had the opportunity to spend some time with friends of ours, and during the day the discussion turned to wrongful death laws in B.C.

By Alex Atamanenko on Wednesday Jul 28 2010

Canada and the European Union are currently negotiating a new free trade agreement called the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA). According to a detailed report prepared by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) Negotiating from Weakness, if CETA is implemented as currently written, Canada’s progressive procurement policies will be seriously at risk.

By Harvey Oberfeld on Tuesday Jul 27 2010

Any cop, lawyer, judge or prosecutor knows that when you give in to blackmail, it’s not the end of the shakedown. Not by any means! Too bad the Canadian Radio Television and Telecommunications Commission never learned that lesson.

It’s only a few months ago that the CRTC caved in to the demands of Canada’s private television networks for a part of the revenues from cable television operators: and not just a short term slice of the pie to get over tough economic times, but a permanent piece of the action.

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