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BC quietly grants Mount Polley permit to pipe mine waste directly into Quesnel Lake

BC quietly grants Mount Polley permit to pipe mine waste directly into Quesnel Lake

This article is from DeSmog Canada, written by Carol Linnit.

The B.C. Ministry of Environment has quietly granted the Mount Polley Mining Corporation permission to drain mining waste directly into Quesnel Lake, B.C.’s deepest fjord lake and a source of drinking water for residents of Likely, B.C., as part of a “long-term water management plan.”

COLUMN: Fair Shares -- the moral way to distribute social wealth: PART II

COLUMN: Fair Shares -- the moral way to distribute social wealth: PART II

This continues a discussion begun in Part I, last week.

Bad Capitalism: exploitation

If there is one single thing that separates me from most Lennonesque liberals and progressives who want One World, it is not my affection for defined and qualified Canadian nationalism. It is that I am anti-capitalist, whereas the majority of global neo-liberal progressives feel that capitalism is operating just fine. They say that because, in their social class, capitalism has enriched them and provided them with privileged, entitled lives that money can buy.

Selkirk College Distinguished Alumnus Rises to Peak of the Ski Industry

Panorama Mountain Village President and CEO Steve Paccagnan will receive the honour of Distinguished Alumnus at the Selkirk College Graduation 2017 ceremony on April 28 at the Castlegar Campus. Paccagnan graduated from the Ski Resort Operations & Management Program in 1988.

One of Canada’s ski industry leaders will be honoured as a Distinguished Alumnus at the upcoming Selkirk College Graduation 2017 ceremony.

COLUMN: The moral way to distribute social wealth -- Part One

COLUMN: The moral way to distribute social wealth -- Part One

Capitalists,Liberals, Nationalists, Intellectuals

News about money

We have been treated to the spectacle this month of a half-dozen Bombardier executives planning to split 32 million dollars among themselves as bonuses, at the same time as the corporation has announced it is about to lay off 14, 000 workers worldwide.

It was also announced that the world will officially have its first trillionaire this year. No doubt we already do, we just don’t have his name.

Canada’s personal income tax turns 100

What’s more, when compared to U.S. states, Canadian provinces have seven of the eight highest top combined rates, with Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, P.E.I. and Manitoba all over 50 per cent. — Fraser Institute image

After 100 years of taxing Canadians, the personal income tax, which began as a small wartime revenue generator, has morphed into a costly, complex behemoth that’s difficult to administer and makes Canada very uncompetitive, finds a new collection of essays by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Caribou, Logging, Wolves and Corporate Donors

Photo by David Moskowitz for DeSmog Canada

What poses the greatest hazard to BC's endangered Southern Mountain Caribou -- habitat loss, wolves, or corporate donors?  Or are all three of those factors linked, and if so, how? This opinion piece is from DeSmog Canada.  Read and contemplate.

New specialty licence plates support charity, non-profit organizations

The expanded program will let even more British Columbians support other worthwhile causes.

Building on the success of the BC Parks licence plates unveiled earlier this year, ICBC is working to expand its specialty plate program to include support for charities and not-for-profit organizations. 

"The response to the BC Parks plates from British Columbians has been tremendous, with more than 14,000 Parks plates sold since the launch at the end of January to help support provincial parks," said Todd Stone, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure.

The Power of Chocolate

The Power of Chocolate

Chocoholics:  Is it possible to know enough about chocolate? What do we need to know, except that it tastes wonderful?  Worldwatch Institute writer Gaelle Gourmelon discusses chocolate's history and the social and ecological impacts of the way it is grown, and how all of us chocoholics can help to improve matters -- even just by choosing what to buy.  This article is from the Worldwatch Institute. 

COLUMN: From the Hill -- 2017 Budget Comments

Member of Parliament Richard Cannings

As I discussed in my last column, the federal government had an opportunity in last week’s budget to finally start closing the growing income inequality gap in Canada. But, unfortunately the Liberals chose tax breaks for wealthy Canadians and giveaways to large corporations over helping the unemployed, veterans, and Indigenous children.

Wanted: more walk, less talk in today’s federal budget

Missed opportunity says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

The federal government missed a key opportunity to walk the walk and tackle income inequality in today’s federal budget, says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Senior Economist David Macdonald.

“While there are some positive aspects to Budget 2017,” Macdonald says, “let’s not mistake this for the bold, visionary inequality reduction budget that Canadians were promised by this government.”

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